BIPOC?  enough!  †  the nation

BIPOC? enough! † the nation

BIPOC?  enough!  †  the nation

It is everywhere! “BIPOC.” You just can’t seem to get over it. We both remember that the preferred reference to those on the receiving end of racist and national oppression was “people of color.” Then suddenly we became BIPOC – a change that many urged as a specific form of enlightenment.

BIPOC, of ​​course, stands for ‘black, indigenous and colored people’. The popularity of the term can be traced back to several factors. One is the demographic transformation of the country after the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, which favored relatives of US citizens and those with specific skills. As a result, larger numbers of migrants from the South have arrived on our shores and have in various ways transformed the discussions of race and color. Two: The decline – until recently – of the Black Freedom Movement, which began in the 1970s, led many leftists and progressives to understand the lingering meaning of anti-Black racism, the oppression of African Americans, and the importance of the Black. Freedom Movement in American Politics Shaping. Third, there is the political revival of the neo-fascist and racist social movement unleashed in fury by Donald Trump. A primary goal of that movement is the complete institutionalization of white minority rule — an American apartheid state — motivated by a deep-seated fear of the “Great Replacement,” that a “majority minority” country will dismantle the systemic white privilege that every political, economic, and social institution in the United States. This right-wing movement’s campaigns against immigrants, Muslims, Black Lives Matter, critical race theory, etc. — ranging from Donald Trump’s rhetorical attacks to the murders in El Paso and Buffalo — have understandably motivated oppressed communities of color to think about how they indicate commonality in their collective struggle for freedom.

However, there is another factor – one that many people like to deny or downplay. And it is an extremely sensitive issue. Under the guise of diversity, the post-1965 immigration law, immigrants of color (and their descendants) began to be moved—by whites—to leadership positions in various nonprofits, unions, and other progressive organizations, displacing non-immigrants of color. These promotions were identified as representatives of “diversity,” even though those elected had a very different – indeed qualitatively different – experience of white supremacist national oppression. Over time, this process resulted in a slow but steady increase in resentment among nonimmigrant colored peoples.