Study shows Medicare for All could have prevented more than 200,000 deaths during the pandemic

Study shows Medicare for All could have prevented more than 200,000 deaths during the pandemic

Study shows Medicare for All could have prevented more than 200,000 deaths during the pandemic

A new study published this month in the journal PNAS claims the US could have saved at least 212,000 lives lost to Covid-19 in 2020 alone if it had a single-payer health care system.

The report criticizes the shortcomings in the US for-profit health care system, arguing that multiple factors in a single-payer system would have reduced fatalities in the first year of the pandemic. Since the start of the pandemic, the US has had more deaths per capita than its economic counterparts. It has also had the most recorded total deaths and cases in the world.

The US health care system, which offers no coverage and leaves millions of people without health insurance, has long been criticized. The US currently spends more per capita on health care than its economic counterparts, but does not enjoy better health outcomes on average; life expectancy in the US, which is falling, is the lowest of any OECD country.

Now researchers are documenting the country’s struggle to contain the worst effects of Covid on the health care system as well.

According to the new study, no one in the US would have lost their health insurance when much of the economy shut down in March 2020. , millions of people lost their employer-based health insurance.

The researchers also believe that vaccination rates in the country would be higher if more Americans had an ongoing relationship with a primary care physician — which one in four Americans does not have — and that those factors would have reduced the Covid-induced pressure on US hospitals. which is also believed to have cost lives during Covid peaks.

Some of the other countries in the OECD that have outperformed the US in Covid deaths do not have single-payer health care systems, but all guarantee health coverage regardless of employment status.

There may also have been other factors that have hurt the US’s Covid response, including racism, President Donald Trump’s Covid denalism echoed by influential members of the conservative and far-right movements across the country, and deep, already existing cultural divides.

The country’s handling of the pandemic has seriously eroded the trust of both patients and doctors in the US health care system, with one in three Americans overall reporting that their trust in the country’s health system has declined since the onset of Covid. .